It’s getting hot outside, folks, and you know what that means … we’re all going to be wearing shorts soon.

Today, at Burn Fitness, it seemed like everyone was wearing shorts — everyone except for me. Yes, I lost 30 pounds on Fatburn.com and through the tireless efforts of my awesome trainer, Keith Sims, but just because I lost weight doesn’t mean I’m immune to “body issues.” Sadly, I think I may be my own worst critic. We are all guilty of this.

So what do you do to combat issues of self-esteem? We’ve talked about motivating the body physically and what to do when you are feeling “blah” about working out, but how do you motivate your psyche when you are feeling down on yourself?

Where there’s a poor body image there’s a solution to be found at the gym. Trust me. But first, you have to feel good about being there.

One of the easiest ways to feel better about your self-image is to change what you’re wearing. Think about how great you feel when you have a new outfit, or even new sneakers. Spiffy togs can help elevate your mood. And if you can’t purchase a new gym ensemble, make sure you find something that you’re comfortable in. I personally don’t wear shorts to the gym. Whether it’s cellulite, a stray vein, a bruise, or stubble — I can’t workout if I feel like people are staring at me (or if I think they are). The reality is that most people aren’t going to be staring at you anyway, but if you feel like a sausage, for God’s sake don’t wrap yourself in Spandex. Get comfortable, loose fitting clothing that breathes.

Get to the gym early. The early bird catches the worm and the best exercise cycle. But honestly, here’s the thing, everyone’s half asleep in the morning and no one will be focused on you. They’ll be thinking about coffee, their job, their day, etc.

Stay on point, but don’t beat yourself up emotionally when you don’t. I was talking to my trainer and we both agreed; it’s so easy to fall off track. Even trainers fall off track. That’s right. Take heart, folks. That trainer who you see that’s in perfect shape, not an ounce of body fat on his or her frame, also struggles the good fight with diet. Sims told me just that same morning one of the trainers said he felt disgusting and horrible because he woofed down a greasy meal the night before and broke his diet. But listen, it happens. It happens to the best of us. The thing to do is not to wallow in the self-loathing but to use that time to get back up on the horse and trot on over to the gym. Don’t let a day of food injury set in motion a cycle of low self-esteem. Don’t say, “Well I had this or I had that so my diet is now doomed.” Don’t let a day or two of diet distress get you all mental.

A change of clothes, an early start, and the ability to forgive yourself when you’ve gone off track are my top three suggestions to help you bolster your self-esteem. Listen, no one ever said this was easy. Give yourself a pat on the back for reading this and thinking about changing your life, because thinking is the first step to doing.

You can reach Taylor at Tailfish@roadrunner.com.

By the numbers

Starting Weight: 182

Pounds Lost: 32.

Current Weight: 150

Goal Weight: 135

Pounds to Lose to Goal: 15