Loading Events

« All Events

  • This event has passed.

Robert Weingarten: Pentimento, Julian Wasser: Duchamp in Pasadena

July 5 @ 11:00 AM - July 5 @ 5:30 PM

http://smdp.com/event/robert-weingarten-pentimento-julian-wasser-duchamp-in-pasadena/all/
|Recurring Event (See all)
Every day until July 5, 2014
| Free

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
July 5, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 16, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
July 4, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 15, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
July 3, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 14, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
July 2, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 13, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
July 1, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 12, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 30, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 11, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 29, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 10, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 28, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 9, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 27, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 8, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 26, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 7, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 25, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 6, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 24, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 5, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 23, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 4, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 22, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 3, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 21, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 2, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 20, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
August 1, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 19, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 31, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 18, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 30, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 17, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 29, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 16, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 28, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 15, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 27, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 14, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 26, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 13, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 25, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 12, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 24, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 11, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 23, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 10, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 22, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 9, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 21, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 8, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 20, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 7, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 19, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 6, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 18, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 5, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 17, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 4, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 16, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 3, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 15, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 2, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 14, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
June 1, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 13, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
May 31, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 12, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
May 30, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 11, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
May 29, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 10, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
May 28, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 9, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
May 27, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 8, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
May 26, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 7, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
May 25, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 6, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map

May 24 – July 5, 2014

Reception: Saturday, May 24, 4-6pm

Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri 10am-5:30pm, Sat 11am-5:30pm

Robert Weingarten describes Pentimento, his recent body of work, as “a re-affirmation of the power of photographic memory.”  Beginning with historic photographs that document major events of the last hundred years, Weingarten re-visits the original locations of these pictures and then makes photographs of the site as it exists today.  He notes that, in these places, life goes on and there are often no reminders of the profound or tragic events that occurred there in the not so distant past.  An Italian painting term, Pentimento is defined as “the presence or emergence of earlier images, forms or strokes that have been changed and painted over.”  Weingarten’s work is a seamless layering of his photographs with the vintage images, a digital process he calls a “translucent composite.”  In one of these montages, Weingarten blends color views of stately London streets with gritty black and white photos of ambulances, firemen, burning buildings and the rubble of the Blitz of WWII.  In another, a ramshackle shantytown, known as a “Hooverville” in the Great Depression, sits in the middle of Central Park in New York, overlaid with contemporary pick-nickers, strollers, balloons and couples lounging in the sun.  In his image of Havana, Weingarten reverses his usual practice of combining vintage black and white with contemporary color.  In this case, a recent black and white street scene is decorated with the brilliantly colored neon signs that enlivened the street in the pre-Castro era.

 

Concurrently, the gallery will present an exhibition of Julian Wasser’s photographs of the Marcel Duchamp Retrospective at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1963.  The exhibition itself, organized by the legendary curator Walter Hopps, was, surprisingly, the first–ever Duchamp retrospective and was held not in New York or Paris, but in Pasadena, California.  Wasser’s photographs of the opening reception include young artists of the LA Art Scene such as Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Larry Bell, Dennis Hopper and a very boyish Andy Warhol visiting from NY.  Inspired by Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase and the artist’s obsession with chess, Wasser orchestrated one of the most iconic staged performance photographs of the 20th Century, posing Duchamp playing chess with a nude woman (a very young Eve Babitz, now a noted author).  On the 50th anniversary of the exhibition, Craig Krull Gallery has assembled a portfolio of 15 of these photographs.  Entitled, Duchamp in Pasadena, these signed, 8×10” gelatin silver prints are housed in a linen clamshell box and limited to an edition of 15.

Print Friendly

Details

Start:
May 24, 2014 11:00 AM
End:
July 5, 2014 5:30 PM
Cost:
Free

Organizer

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
Email:
Website:
info@craigkrullgallery.com

Venue

Craig Krull Gallery
Phone:
310-828-6410
2525 Michigan Ave Building B3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 United States
+ Google Map
Yes/No